WesternBluebird

Western Bluebird

Small and colorful, bluebirds are a member of the thrush family. Easy to spot with their brilliant blue feathers, the bluebird is a welcome sight to any backyard. Western Bluebirds are characterized by their bright blue feathers, blue head and gray belly. Bluebirds of all kinds love open spaces so welcoming backyards with expansive open space and natural cover scattered about for shelter are a favorite. Bluebirds eat a diet of insects, native fruits and berries. Mealworms are readily devoured and are a perfect treat that can be served in small dishes on your decks or nearby trees.

Favorite Foods

Mealworms, whether fresh or dried, are the perfect treat for your visiting bluebirds. High in protein and nutrients, mealworms are sure to attract these colorful birds. In addition, you may see them munching on Insect Treasure & BerryWise® suet cakes.

Nesting

Bluebirds nest in spring and summer and prefer natural or man-made cavities filling them with fine grasses, feathers and soft materials. Our Bluebird Winged Nest Box and Traditional Cedar Bluebird Nest Box are sized specifically for bluebirds and features side “wings” that open for safe and fascinating observation of nestlings and cleaning. Our Convertible Bluebird Box serves double duty as a roosting box in winter and nesting box in summer. Be sure to mount your houses 6’ off the ground in an open area facing away from the wind.

Use a pole baffle to discourage predators! All nesting birds are subject to predation and Bluebirds are no exception. To ensure their safety, if mounted on a pole we suggest installing a pole baffle to discourage squirrels, raccoons and snakes. Predator Guards, which fit around the hole of the nest box, are also available and excellent choices for discouraging pesky animals.

Did You Know?

Bluebird populations suffered a significant population decline (on a nationwide basis) before concerned
individuals and organizations began putting up nest boxes and creating bluebird trails (series of nest boxes that extends over a distance). When choosing a box, the female bird has final say! Who knew!